Checking Out the Forbes 30 under 30 / by Scott A.

Every year Forbes publishes its 30 people under 30 years of age in manufacturing and industry who are making some big moves. Forbes claims it has an acceptance rate of less than 4%, which makes this list harder to get accepted to than Stanford or Harvard. These young minds are intelligent, motivated, and are making a difference in industry. While most of the technology has been covered by Machine Design, we noticed a few familiar faces we wanted to highlight.

Sean Petterson, 26

Founder of StrongArm Technologies

Featured in a few of our articles, Sean first talked to Machine Design about “The Rise of the Exoskeletons.” He talked about how passive and soft exoskeletons promote proper ergonomics. This saves companies money and reduces paid leave for injuries. In addition, employees handling heavier material for longer periods may be necessary if we expect jobs to return to our shores.

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Sean is passionate about this company. His father died on a construction site, and now Sean hopes he can generate products to make sure workers get home without injury, and some extra energy to enjoy their time at home. Next year, StrongArm Technologies looks to make $8 million in revenue.

Coby Kabili, 28

Braydon Moreno, 29

Cofounders of Robo 3D

Seeing another fused filament fabrication (FFF) printer didn’t excite me. What did was talking to Braydon Moreno at the 2016 Inside 3D printing Conference and Expo. By offering printing kits that offered everything an owner of a 3D printer needs to know on how to create fun or complex prints with stl files that have been proven to print working models, I started listening. This was more than just a printer, this young team had built a company that stood above the others at a time when everyone seemed to be coming out with their own FFF printer. Robo was started in 2012 from a Kickstarter campaign, and in its most recent fiscal year earned $4.7 million.

Justin Wenning, 24

Welding Engineer at Fabrisonic

Fabrisonic was noted in a couple Machine Design articles for its unique technique of 3D printing. This is a laminate technique that uses layers of foil metals and an ultrasonic horn to weld layers together. As complex electronics, cube satellites, and desire for complex material properties become more popular, Fabrisonic is producing some interesting work. Behind this work is one of Fabrisonic’s engineers, Justin Wenning. He specializes in finding ways to capitalize on the 3D printing of metals in satellites by integrating structural, electrical, and shielding components that can double as heat exchangers with this technique.

Neha Gupta, 28

Business Operations, DAQRI

Machine Design talked to DAQRI for our article on augmented and virtual reality. While this technology is ready to start expanding this year, the DAQRI headset is like the HoloLens but is working on getting its eye and head protection certifications. This will be a great way to communicate between the office and the project floor. Neha will be managing manufacturing and supply for DAQRI.

Justin Barozie, 28

Associate Manager of Manufacturing Engineering, Battery, Tesla Motors

We highlighted Justin’s work in “Charged Up: Where do Electric Vehicles Go From Here?” as he specifically worked on the Model 3 battery modules. Justin also works with manufacturing engineers that have tackled over 50 mass-production, multimillion-dollar, state-of-the-art automation projects.

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Marine Couteau, 26

Ladislas de Toldi, 28

Cofounders of Leka

Featured in “Is 2017 the Year for Helper Robots?,” Marine and Ladislas are passionate about helping others. Leki is a helper robot that changes the way children with developmental disorders learn, play, and progress. The device is an interactive tool designed to make communication between therapists, parents, and children easier, efficient, and accessible.

Make sure you check out the other 30 under 30 at Forbes here.